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[[Category:12-passenger vehicles]]
 
[[Category:12-passenger vehicles]]
 
[[Category:15-passenger vehicles]]
 
[[Category:15-passenger vehicles]]
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[[Category:8-cylinder vehicles]]
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[[Category:6-cylinder vehicles]]
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[[Category:Full-size cars]]
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[[Category:Rear-wheel drive vehicles]]
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[[Category:4-speed automatic vehicles]]

Latest revision as of 16:44, March 19, 2020

Year-to-year changesEdit

1991Edit

In 1991, both the GMC Rally and Vandura were available in two series -- 1500 and 2500.

1993Edit

The GMC Rally 1500 series was discontinued after 1993.

1995Edit

For 1995, the GMC Rally/Vandura full-size van essentially marked time. It only received a few small improvements, most of which consisted of minor, but hardly unimportant, engine enhancements. Positioned in the middle of the full-size van category, the GMC Rally was designed to appeal to buyers whose main interest was a no-nonsense, solid workhorse capable of handling big loads of people or cargo. And that was the Rally's long-standing strong suit, for it could carry as many as 15 passengers, mounds of bulky cargo and properly equipped, tow as much as 10,000 pounds. Competitors consisted of its corporate kissing cousin, the Chevrolet Van, Ford's Club Wagon, and Dodge's Ram Van.

The Rally was available in regular and extended body styles on two different wheelbases and in two series, 2500 and 3500. The Vandura offered a choice of one of three wheelbases in its 1500, 2500 and 3500 series. The standard engine remained the 4.3-liter ohv V6, which had been re-engineered with the addition of a counter-rotating balance shaft to eliminate noise and vibration at high speeds. Optional engines included a 5.0-liter ohv V8, 5.7-liter ohv V8 (each of which now featured improved exhaust manifolds) and a 7.4-liter ohv V8 with a newly modified valvetrain that boasted quieter operation. A pair of optional diesels were also available, a light-duty and a heavy-duty 6.5-liter V8. All engines mated with a 4-speed automatic transmission. The transmission mated to the 7.4-liter V8 had been revised for smoother shifting.

The Rally Wagon went on sale first late in 1994 as a 1995 model, and the Vandura followed in early 1995.

1996Edit

Like the Chevrolet Sportvan, 1996 was the last model year for the GMC Vandura, whereas at the same time, the Chevrolet Express and GMC Savana took their place.

Retail pricesEdit

As of December 17, 1993:

  • $16,006 (1994 GMC Vandura 1500)
  • $15,975 (1994 GMC Vandura 2500)
  • $16,239 (1994 GMC Vandura 3500)
  • $18,359 (1994 GMC Vandura 3500 Extended)
  • $19,086 (1994 GMC Rally Wagon 2500)
  • $20,370 (1994 GMC Rally Wagon 3500)
  • $21,526 (1994 GMC Rally Wagon 3500 Extended)

As of late 1994:

  • $19,706 (1995 GMC Rally Wagon 2500)
  • $21,100 (1995 GMC Rally Wagon 3500)
  • $22,256 (1995 GMC Rally Wagon 3500 Extended)

As of August 1, 1995:

  • $17,009 (1995 GMC Vandura 1500)
  • $17,193 (1995 GMC Vandura 1500 Extended)
  • $16,978 (1995 GMC Vandura 2500)
  • $17,183 (1995 GMC Vandura 2500 Extended)
  • $17,337 (1995 GMC Vandura 3500)
  • $19,472 (1995 GMC Vandura 3500 Extended)
  • $19,806 (1995 GMC Rally Wagon 2500)
  • $21,200 (1995 GMC Rally Wagon 3500)
  • $22,356 (1995 GMC Rally Wagon 3500 Extended)
  • $21,951 (1996 GMC Rally Wagon)
  • $22,856 (1996 GMC Rally Wagon Extended)

As of October 1, 1995:

  • $18,969 (1996 GMC Rally Wagon 3500)
  • $19,972 (1996 GMC Rally Wagon 3500 Extended)

Shipping pricesEdit

  • $580 (1994 models)
  • $590 (1995 models)
  • $595 (1996 models; Rally Wagon and Vandura)
  • $600 (1996 models; Savana)

GalleryEdit

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