Positioned at the high end of the compact sport/utility market, the Range Rover is designed to appeal to affluent buyers who demand luxury and style as well as off-road capability. Major competitors for the Classic include the Chevrolet and GMC Suburbans, the Toyota Land Cruiser and the Jeep Grand Cherokee.

Year-to-year changes[edit | edit source]

1991[edit | edit source]

The original Range Rover from 1991 had two different models: County SE and Wagon.

1995[edit | edit source]

For 1995, Land Rover's Range Rover model received a number of major upgrades. Foremost for the flagship vehicle in Land Rover's sport/utility triumvirate was the addition of driver- and passenger-side airbags and side door impact beams. 

Other major changes included an all-new interior featuring separate driver and passenger temperature control systems, a new tilt steering wheel, pop-out dash-mounted cup holders, a full-size passenger-side glovebox and a revised center console.

In addition, the model line was simplified. The Range Rover County and Range Rover County LWB (Long Wheelbase) merged into a single vehicle: the 4-door Range Rover Classic. The new vehicle featured a single powertrain, a 4.2-liter aluminum ohv V8 mated to a 4-speed automatic transmission. (The former 3.9-liter ohv V8 has been dropped.) The Classic continued to utilize full-time 4-wheel drive and an exclusive 4-wheel traction-control system as well as its innovative height-adjustable electronic air suspension. This system used four air springs, height sensors and antisway bars to maintain a level ride.

The 1995 Range Rover County went on sale in April 1994, at the same time with the 1994 Discovery. In January 1995, Range Rover introduced a new top-of-the-line model, called the 4.0 SE. But, just like Coca-Cola, the Classic version remained on the market.

1996[edit | edit source]

In the spring of 1995, Land Rover introduced an all-new Range Rover. The 4.0 SE replaced the discontinued LWB as the marque's flagship. The new Range Rover 4.0 SE retains the command driving position, hood and front-end treatments, the large glass area and split tailgate of its predecessor, but rides on a new chassis and suspension. The new interior has more room for passengers and cargo. It also features plush levels of comfort. The engine is a 4.0-liter aluminum ohv V8, mated only to a 4-speed automatic transmission. 

Positioned at the high end of the compact sport/utility market, the Range Rover is designed to appeal to affluent buyers who demand luxury and style as well as uncompromised off-road capability. Major competitors include the Chevrolet and GMC Suburbans, Toyota Land Cruiser and the Jeep Grand Cherokee. Joining the Range Rover 4.0 SE will be the Range Rover 4.6 HSE, a limited-production version featuring a 225-hp 4.6-liter aluminum ohv V8. The high-performance image will be enhanced with sporty low-profile tires, 18-in. alloy wheels and a leather interior. Both Range Rovers feature a sophisticated height-adjustable air suspension, electronic traction control, 4-wheel antilock brakes and a permanent 4-wheel-drive system.

As of the 1996 model year, the 4.6 HSE would be the most expensive SUV ever sold in the United States.

Retail prices[edit | edit source]

As of August 31, 1994:

  • $52,500 (1995 Land Rover Range Rover County LWB)

As of January 3, 1995:

  • $45,000 (1995 Land Rover Range Rover County Classic)
  • $54,000 (1995 Land Rover Range Rover 4.0 SE)

As of September 14, 1995:

  • $55,000 (1996 Land Rover Range Rover 4.0 SE)
  • $62,000 (1996 Land Rover Range Rover 4.6 HSE)


Gallery[edit | edit source]

95rangerover.jpg
96rangerovercounty.jpg
96rangerovercounty interior.jpg
95rangerover2.jpg
96rangerover40se.jpg
96rangerover40se2.jpg
96rangerover46hse.jpg
96rangerover46hse2.jpg
96rangerover46hse3.jpg
96rangerover interior.jpg
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